quantum physics

Right now, this second, an old man is exhaling his last breath.  Elsewhere, two young lovers exchange their first kiss.  Farther afield, two asteroids silently collide. Sunrise comes to a planet orbiting a neighboring star. This very second, a supernova detonates in a faraway galaxy. 

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Quantum physics assumes that the laws of nature are not deterministic and this is certainly good news for free will.  Already the philosopher Immanuel Kant remarked in his Critique of Pure Reason (1781) that freedom is opposed to the deterministic natural law of cause and effect characteristic of classical physics.

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Big Questions Online is gearing up for summer with essays and discussions addressing a range of topics, including quantum physics, meditation, technology, free will, and science and religion.

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Not in any direct way. That is, it doesn’t provide an argument for the existence of God.  But it does so indirectly, by providing an argument against the philosophy called materialism (or “physicalism”), which is the main intellectual opponent of belief in God in today’s world. 

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